How to choose a digital publisher? – Part 2

In my last post, I discussed some tips that would help a writer decide which digital publisher to choose for manuscript submission. Today, I want to discuss some other points that a writer should consider before signing with a digital publisher.

1)      A digital publisher will take digital publishing rights only, and not print. That is, unless, they promise to take your book out in print also. If they are only taking the option to take the book out in print depending on sales, it should be clear as to how many months you can wait before you submit the print version elsewhere.

2)      They should specify for how long they are taking the rights. Not for your lifetime, certainly. Five years, or two years since the date of publication is preferable and then you can all re-negotiate the contract.

3)      They should send you few free digital copies of the book. They will also create many formats of the book for sale.

4)      They should send you ARCs so you can get reviews.

5)      The publisher should design the book cover at no cost to you and get ISBN also.

6)      The publisher gets first right to look at any sequel to your work that they have, but not to any other work.

It is a writer’s duty to ensure that they are happy with the book contract before signing it. It’s always best to read the contract from start to finish and once again. If you don’t have a lawyer, get a friend to read it for you to get his/her feedback. Do you homework before selling your manuscript so you don’t have any regrets later on.

Related Posts:

List of Digital Publishers

Work of a self-published author as compared to an author with a publishing house

The things your digital publisher would do for you

 

2 Responses to “How to choose a digital publisher? – Part 2”

  1. Superb blog! Do you have any tips for aspiring writers? I’m planning to start my own site soon but I’m a little lost on everything. Would you recommend starting with a free platform like WordPress or go for a paid option? There are so many choices out there that I’m completely confused .. Any recommendations? Thanks!

  2. Sabine says:

    Either way is fine. If you are serious about writing as a career, it’s better to start with a paid site as it shows your commitment.

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